Which of these dangerous dental health issues do you already have?

dental-health-issuesAccording to the American Dental Association, the overwhelming majority of people in the United States – men, women, and children – are living with some kind of dental health issue that they aren’t even aware of.

Sure, most of us visit the dentist regularly (at least for an annual checkup and especially when we’re dealing with an oral health problems that we notice or one that impacts our day-to-day lives), but most of us try to avoid the dentist is much as we can. There’s just something about sitting on that chair with a giant light above us with a man or woman poking around in our mouths that we aren’t all that comfortable with.

Unfortunately, dental health issues and oral health issues can have a transformative impact the rest of your body, which is why you need to address these issues ASAP before they have a chance to really do a number on you. This is why it’s so important to visit your dentist at least once a year for a checkup, and why it is so critical that you follow accepted guidelines for maintaining and improving oral health as closely as humanly possible.

That means brushing twice daily, using the right toothbrush and toothpaste, flossing like it’s your job, and falling back in love with fluoride. Regular cleanings at the dental office wouldn’t hurt, either!

And if you think you may be dealing with some of the dangerous dental health issues that millions and millions of Americans are living with right now, you’re going to want to pay attention to the details we have for you below.

Let’s jump right in!

Abscessed tooth

And abscessed tooth is essentially an infection that starts at the “pulp” of your tooth before it settles into the root (usually right up against the jawbone) before it creates a swollen and pus filled pocket on your guns.

Most people that are dealing with abscessed teeth notice it almost immediately, as this is one of the most painful dental health issues you’ll ever come across. It’s going to make chewing really difficult, it can induce pain and fevers, and it can cause a world of bad breath that is almost impossible to kick.

Most of the time, as assessed teeth can be addressed without too much trouble, but those that get more serious are going to need to have the tooth removed, or even a root canal performed.

Cavities

Probably the most common type of dental health issue that almost everyone has had to deal with once or twice in their lives, cavities affect everyone (young and old) pretty equally.

Essentially pockets of damaged tooth enamel that are formed when acid eats away at the tooth, cavities are dangerous because they are hotbeds for bacteria to grow in. They carry absolutely love these little pockets, and they multiplied like crazy – producing a bunch of acid in the process that works to continue to erode the teeth away even more!

Small and superficial cavities can be filled in with fillings (metal-based or synthetic to match the color of your teeth), but bigger cavities they require a crown to be placed on top of the tooth or (in some extreme cases) the tooth to be removed completely.

Dry sockets

Teeth that have been removed (or teeth that have been knocked out) are usually going to have their position “in-line” grown over with new gum material if they do not have a replacement put in the space in time.

However, sometimes the gums aren’t going to grow over that space because the blood clot that builds up in that socket dissipates or is reabsorbed into the body too quickly. If that happens, a dry socket situation is going to occur, and that’s bad news for sure.

The nerves that run underneath the teeth are going to be exposed, and you’re talking about one of the more painful experiences a person can ever have to go through. Dry sockets are going to need to be addressed ASAP by a professional, and are usually result by a quick cleaning, a local anesthetic and anti-inflammatory/pain pills, and a specially designed bandage that keeps the socket moist and protected from outside interference.

Gingivitis

There are some reports that suggest almost 80% of all adults in the United States are dealing with at least a mild case of gingivitis, and honestly the figure could be even higher.

This is a gum disease caused by bacteria that infects the gums and your teeth, and usually causes try mouth sensations, bad breath, guns that book red and swollen, and even a lot of pain. Gum disease is almost always reversible (especially during the early stages), but it needs to be addressed before it has the opportunity to really spiral out of control.

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